DraftExpressProfile: Brook Lopez, Stats, Comparisons, and Outlook
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Brook Lopez
STRENGTHS:
- Ability to get to free throw line
- Timing
- Ability to establish position in post
- Back to basket scoring
- Excellent hands
- Jump-hook shot
- Defensive Post Presence
- Lateral quickness
- Intelligence
- Patient
- Work ethic
- High-level productivity
- Ability to run the floor
- Coordination
- Excellent wingspan
- Frail frame
- Size for position
- Undersized
- Mid-range Jumper
- Perimeter shooting ability
- Perimeter shooting potential
WEAKNESSES:
- Predictable offensively
- Settles for bad shots
- Left hand
- Man amongst boys?
- Academic issues?
- Doesn't always know limitations
- Mechanical player
- Role-player potential
- Unorthodox style
- Passing out of post
- Passing skills
- Average athleticism
- Average rebounder
- Low shooting percentages
Recent Tweets
All Tweets
DraftExpress: Scoring at will. So skilled its ridiculous. Against Brook Lopez especially. RT @ChampWIllSy05 How does Cousins look?
2013-01-05 22:35:27
RT @SebastianPruiti: I've been using this for a little while. It is so awesome. I just watched all of Brook Lopez's post makes...so cool...
2010-04-20 02:16:17
For all the Brook Lopez fans-- No arguments. Kind of preferred 4's who can play smallball 5 in FIBA (Love, D-Lee), but I like Lopez a lot.
2010-04-04 17:37:00
Not even close dude. RT @honger66: Samhan reminds me a little of brook lopez. same concerns raised about him and he's doing pretty well
2010-03-20 13:42:16
Top 25s - Full List
RankCategoryTotal
20EFF24.1
24Pts/g18.8
16Pts1542
8ORB/g3.3
3ORB270
15Reb708
8BK/g1.7
25BK/40p1.9
6BK139
23TO204
Team: Nets College Team: Nets
PhysicalsPositionsRankings SalaryMisc
H: 7' 0"
W: 256 lbs
Bday: 04/01/1988
(26 Years Old)
Current: C
NBA:   PF/C
Possible: C
RSCI: 9
Agent: Arn Tellem
Current Salary:$15,719,063
High School: San Joaquin Memorial
Hometown: Fresno, CA
Drafted:  Pick 10 in 2008 by Nets
Best Case: Chris Kaman Meets P.J. Brown
Worst Case: Brendan Haywood

Predraft Measurements
YearSourceHeight w/o ShoesHeight w/shoesWeightWingspanStanding ReachBody FatNo Step VertMax Vert
2008NBA Pre-Draft Camp6' 11.25"7' 0.5"2567' 5.5"9' 5"6.327.530.5

Basic Per Game Statistics - Comprehensive Stats - Statistical Top 25s
YearLeagueNameGPMinPtsFGFGAFG%2Pt2PtA2P%3Pt3PtA3P%FTMFTAFT%OffDefTOTAstsStlsBlksTOsPFs
2014/15NBABrook Lopez1630.116.16.613.449.16.613.449.10.00.0 2.93.682.51.94.16.10.80.71.72.23.1

Player Page  |  Player Stats  |  Mock Draft History  |  Related Articles  |  Add to My Draft Express 
 
Rookie Retrospective: Brook Lopez
March 2, 2009
Part One: Post Game (Good)

Then:

“Stanford is relying on Lopez to score more this season, especially on the low block, where Lopez’s results have been mixed. Inside five feet, Lopez looks nearly automatic, showing good touch and the strength to finish over pretty much anyone at this level. He shows solid footwork and will use drop-steps, spin moves, and mini-hooks to score. When he wants to, Lopez does an excellent job establishing deep position and sealing his man off down low.”
NCAA Weekly Performers, 1/25/08- Part Two

Now:

Lopez obviously isn’t being relied upon anywhere near as heavily by the New Jersey Nets as he was by Stanford last year. He’s asked to shoulder less offensive responsibility, which has made him quite a bit more efficient from the field, upping his percentages from 46.8% to 51.3%. He’s much more of a finisher now, cutting off the ball, playing pick and roll with his guards, and taking catch and shoot jump-shots—as opposed to his role on Stanford—where he was asked to catch the ball in the post and grind with his back to the basket on nearly every possession.

Part Two: Post Game (Bad)

Then:

“Lopez is very formulaic in this range when he has his back to the basket, never trying to further back his man down once he has the ball, never putting the ball on the floor for more than one dribble, and almost always going right up into a right-handed hook shot or a turnaround jumper, often rushing his shot. Watching him in this area of the court, you get the idea that he knows exactly what he's going to do even before he gets the ball, regardless of how the defense is reacting to him. He shows no counter-moves or fakes in this range, and doesn't adjust to what the defense gives him. Lopez has had very little success with his hook shot from this range so far this season, and while he's done slightly better with his turnaround jumper, he still isn't converting on that consistently either. It seems as if Lopez really lacks in comfort level and confidence with his back to the basket in this five to seven foot range, and that's something he'll need to work on moving forward.”
NCAA Weekly Performers, 1/25/08- Part Two

Now:

According to Synergy Sports Technology, Lopez gets 34% of his offense with his back to the basket in the post, but only converts on 42% of those attempts. On all other shots, he’s converting 57%. As many often point out, the biggest change in the level of competition when comparing the NCAA and NBA often has to do with the big men, who are far bigger, stronger and more athletic. As we often saw already last season, Lopez struggles to score at times because of a lack of variety and fluidity in his post repertoire. He loves to go to his right handed hook, but struggles with his consistency and is rather predictable due to the lack of polish on his left hand. The slow and mechanical coordination he shows in the post hurt his effectiveness as well, and he has a tendency to predetermine what move he's going to use before he even touches the ball.

Never considered much of a passer in college, Lopez has continued along that same path in the NBA thus far, even regressing statistically in that aspect. He’s been fairly turnover prone, struggling to deal with double teams and not always quite knowing his limitations, which is not exactly a shock considering his rookie status. Right now he ranks in the top 10 amongst the worst passers per-possession in the NBA.

Many of the problems Lopez has on the offensive end stem from a lack of explosiveness caused by his high center of gravity. Despite the fact that he gets low to maintain position on the block, when he goes into his move he stands too upright, which makes him easy to defend. This is perhaps most evident when looking at how few free throws he attempts a game. Lopez's paltry 2.2 free throws a game ranks him towards the bottom amongst starting centers in the league. For a big man who shoots over 80% from the stripe, he would benefit greatly from getting to the line more often. If he can learn to stay low throughout his pivots and establish a wider base, he'll have an easier time powering towards the basket, which ultimately will lead to more trips to the line.

Lopez also shows some glimpses of potential facing up from the mid-post and beating his man off the dribble—something he surely has the skill-level to do. If he can improve his ball-handling skills enough to utilize this part of his game more, maybe after using a shot-fake, he will surely find himself at the free throw line more as well.

Part Three: Pick and Rolls/Finishing

Then:

“Lopez also has shown a strong knack for finishing on rolls to the basket off pick-and-roll situations, using his size, touch, and good hands to consistently catch and finish at the rim. He also has improved his rebounding this year, showing a good pursuit of the ball and a consistent tendency to box out his man strongly.”
NCAA Weekly Performers, 1/25/08- Part Two

Now:

The pick and roll is a staple of most NBA offenses –especially for teams that have quick, talented point guards. The Nets have one of the quickest and most talented young guards in the game in Devin Harris, and he's certainly very dangerous in pick and roll situations. As good as Harris is, having a solid and skilled big man setting screens for him has helped him put up the numbers he has this season. With Brook Lopez, the Nets drafted a perfect complement to Harris and they can be a deadly one-two punch for years to come for a New Jersey team that has historically ran the pick and roll effectively.

There are several things that make Lopez such a reliable target in these situations. He has great hands and shows it nightly by catching touch passes from Harris or Vince Carter in traffic and laying the ball gently off the glass. They would be reluctant to pass him the ball if he didn't finish –something he excelled at in college and has done well enough this season to earn their respect. He's fundamentally sound at the rim, never dipping the ball or putting it on the ground unnecessarily when he rolls. His outstanding length (possessing a tremendous 7-5 wingspan and 9-5 standing reach) helps him a great deal in that regard, as combined with his size (7-0.5 in shoes) and strength, he’s able to fluidly finish around the basket with relative ease.



Lopez also has a solid basketball IQ. He reads defenders well –knowing when to slip a screen, when to hold the screen for an extra second, and when to pop. The suddenness with which he jumps out to the top of the key from the block to set screens make him even more effective as his man is often a step behind him and late to help out on Harris or recover back to the block.

Most of Lopez’s offense in fact comes as a finisher—whether off cuts, pick and rolls, offensive rebounds, or running the floor in transition. On the season, he’s making 165/277 or just under 60% of his non-post-up attempts around the basket –which is an outstanding rate that already puts him amongst the NBA’s elite big men.

The success that he's had shows that Lopez really understands the game. It's not easy for a player to adjust to a whole new system and find a way to be productive when he's not the first or even second option after being the focal point on every other team he's played on. However, he's managed to do just that, and the way he's thrived and adapted to the offense helped the Nets stay in the playoff hunt.

Part Four: Mid-Range Jump-Shot

Then:

“Possessing range out to college three point line, he was able to open up the floor for his brother Robin with his ability to score from the perimeter. We had the chance to observe Lopez this summer during an open gym session at the LeBron James Skills Academy, where we were surprised to see that he can even shoot the ball with consistency out to the NBA three point line. His capability to stretch the defense and create one on one opportunities for teammates will only help him in the eyes of NBA scouts. ”
Top NBA Draft Prospects in the Pac-10 (Part One: #1-#5) - September 18, 2007

Now:


At the collegiate level, the only time you would see Lopez taking jump-shots was in warm-ups prior to the game. It’s easy to understand why, as he was so much bigger and stronger than his opponents that his coach probably felt he’d be letting his opponents off the hook by allowing his prized big man step out to the perimeter. Still, it wasn’t hard to see that the potential was there, if you actually did get to see Lopez attempt a few jumpers.

Lopez has really stood out in his rookie season with his ability to face up and make jump-shots from the high post. He has a very nice stroke for a big guy, and displays adequate form as he holds the ball high over his head, making him difficult to block. His touch is obviously terrific—not only does he make 82% of his free throws, but he’s converted on 30/63 or 47% of his field goal attempts from 17 to 20 feet, according to Synergy’s quantified player report. He may not always shoot quite that well as the sample size increases, but it’s very evident that he has terrific potential in this area, which will open up the paint significantly for the likes of Devin Harris and Vince Carter to slash to the rim, and force the defense to adjust accordingly.

Part Five: Rebounding/Athleticism

Then:

“Lopez is blessed with excellent physical attributes-- including a legit seven foot body, outstanding wingspan, and above average leaping ability for a center prospect. His frame is not carrying anything close to its maximum weight, as it could stand to gain another 20 pounds or so easily. The big man does a nice job running the floor, often filling the wings in transition and beating opposing centers down the floor for easy buckets.”
Top NBA Draft Prospects in the Pac-10 (Part One: #1-#5) - September 18, 2007

Now:

Lopez is a fundamentally sound player and pays great attention to detail, and this is never more evident than when he is cleaning the glass. He does an outstanding job of boxing out, driving his man away from the basket and keeping him on his back. Establishing the same strong base when boxing out that he does in the paint offensively, he is not afraid to be physical. The toughness he displays often allows him to get a hand on the ball even when he isn't in ideal position to do so.

Lopez's great build doesn't hurt him either –standing over 7-feet tall, with a superb wingspan and weighing in at 260 pounds, he had an NBA body even before his name was called on draft night. Lopez uses his frame extremely well, and this is especially apparent in his rebounding numbers, given the fact that he isn't a great leaper. He stands tall and always pursues the ball with two hands, therefore never getting the ball knocked away or getting stripped by guards coming in from behind. He shows his great hands when rebounding and is often coming down with boards in traffic –a clear sign of a good rebounder. There's definite reason to believe Lopez will be a double-double guy down the road, even if it did not appear that way at all when he first arrived at the college level.

He's currently averaging 8 rebounds per game in just under 30 minutes, which translates to 11 rebounds per 40 pace adjusted –a very impressive stat—and somewhat surprisingly, identical to his numbers as a college sophomore. His work ethic and perseverance also have a lot to do with these numbers. He never gives up on a rebound no matter how out of reach it may be. With more experience and added minutes, Lopez will regularly be among the NBA's top rebounders. On a team that's been looking for the right fit at center for what seems like the last decade, Lopez has to be a breath of fresh air for the Nets.

Lopez is a deceptively good athlete for someone of his size, especially considering his reputation. His athleticism is almost hidden in a way because of his awkwardness on the offensive end and the fact that he won't dazzle anyone with a play or a move. With that said, he's one of the better running big men in the game today, regularly beating opposing big men down the floor thanks in large part to his huge stride-length and great stamina. He's recorded countless follow up dunks this year and has been the recipient of many alley-oops on Nets fast breaks.

Part Four: Defense

Then:

“On the defensive end, Lopez has done a good job this season, showing versatility and a lot of potential as a defender. In man-to-man situations in the post, Lopez plays a strange style of defense, never using a hand or forearm on his opponent, rather keeping his hands outstretched in the air and just using his body to stay in front of his man by moving laterally. This throws many players off, forcing them into travels or offensive fouls, and also allows Lopez to contest anyone who tries to shoot over him, but it also leaves him prone to being backed down when someone with his strength shouldn't be. Laterally, Lopez is definitely above average for a seven-footer, looking competent when forced out on the perimeter, and also doing a good job defending pick-and-rolls with his mobility. He does show some problems reacting to quick moves by agile forwards in the post, though. As a weakside shot blocker, Lopez is very aware and focused, and is solid contesting and blocking shots in the lane in a very controlled manner, not committing foolish fouls.”
NCAA Weekly Performers, 1/25/08- Part Two



Now:

Lopez has been terrific on this end of the floor. He's very active and always in tune to what's going on around him. He currently ranks 5th in the league in blocked shots, with 1.9 per game. While that is an impressive stat, the way Lopez records those blocks is equally impressive; often keeping the ball in play to spark the Nets high powered fast break. He does a great job of staying in his stance for whole possessions as well. He'll often dip down into an athletic position when the ball is on the perimeter and muscle his man out of the paint. He's able to do this and stay out of foul trouble –a truly uncommon characteristic of most young centers in the NBA today. He doesn't leave his feet a lot or over commit, showing good discipline in standing his ground and getting his hands up to alter shots with his giant standing reach.

Despite his average lateral quickness, Lopez does a fairly good job against quicker big guys who like to play away from the basket due in large part to his fundamentals. He keeps one hand up and in his man's face, using his great length to contest shots while leaving a cushion to deny penetration. He shouldn't be left alone often on the perimeter with quicker players, but Lopez can hold his own against many players his size by being smart and not being too aggressive.

Lopez uses that same awareness to make his presence felt as a weak side defender, acting like a wall when guards try to penetrate. At times he can be a little too stiff as he's reluctant to foul, making it easy for players to finish around him. The one thing that can never be questioned about him is his effort. He contests all shots, and even on possessions where he's late to recover and has no chance of blocking the shot, he'll sprint out and do whatever he can to bother the shooter. He also does a nice job hedging out on screens to slow up the opposing guard before rotating back to his man with his hands in the air to deflect any pass coming his way. Despite his lack of lateral quickness, it is clear that he's well-schooled in how to compensate for it on the defensive end.

When defending the block, he works hard to front or three-quarter front his man to make for a difficult post entry pass. When his man does get the ball, he uses his strong upper body to make it difficult for his man to back him in as he bodies up with his chest as he did in college. He’s been somewhat foul prone at times, but should be able to improve in this area as he gains more experience.

Part Five: Intangibles

Then:

“Following a freshman season where Brook Lopez posted good numbers despite coming off back surgery, many were expecting more big things from him this year. So it was obviously disappointing when Lopez missed the first nine games of the season due to academic ineligibility. To Lopez's credit, his response to the situation has been as mature as one can expect from a college sophomore. Lopez has publicly blamed himself for Stanford's early-season loss to Siena, a game in which he was unable to participate. He also called the ineligibility “an embarrassment to me and my family.” Lopez claims the time off has helped him grow, giving him an improved work ethic, which definitely is showing, as his production is up noticeably across the board.”
NCAA Weekly Performers, 1/25/08- Part Two

Now:

When the Nets drafted Lopez, they drafted a high character player with an outstanding pedigree. Although somewhat unusual with his off the court interests (comic books, the Disney franchise) he's very popular with his teammates. His work ethic is obviously top notch, and that is evident by his receptiveness to his coaches and his willingness to learn. Effort is the one constant with him, which has earned him a great deal of playing time very quickly under the highly demanding Lawrence Frank. This is not something you can teach, and with the foundation that Lopez has he will be in the League for a long time. While it will depend greatly on continued improvement and player movement in the future, it is not unfathomable to think that Lopez could sneak onto a few All-Star teams without being his team's first option. Considering his size, the position he plays and where the Nets picked him (shockingly finding him available at 10) he is clearly looking like the biggest steal of the 2008 draft.
[Read Full Article]
 
Orlando Summer League, Day Two
July 9, 2008
Brook Lopez had a much stronger outing today (18 points, 7 rebounds, 8/10 FG, 20 minutes) which was to be expected and exactly the reason we didn’t worry too much about his performance in game one. He was much more aggressive establishing position and receiving the ball inside, and looked very good finishing around the basket with a variety of hook shots on good, quick, strong moves. There aren’t many 7-footers out there who can score like he can inside, which is why he was so highly valued coming into this draft. He even knocked down a mid-range jumper for good measure. Defensively, he struggled again with foul trouble, as he could not move his feet quickly enough and suffered greatly by how tightly the referees are calling most of the games here. He picked up 7 fouls in 20 minutes…
[Read Full Article]
 
NCAA Weekly Performers, 1/25/08-- Part Two
January 25, 2008
Following a freshman season where Brook Lopez posted good numbers despite coming off back surgery, many were expecting more big things from him this year. So it was obviously disappointing when Lopez missed the first nine games of the season due to academic ineligibility. To Lopez’s credit, his response to the situation has been as mature as one can expect from a college sophomore. Lopez has publicly blamed himself for Stanford’s early-season loss to Siena, a game in which he was unable to participate. He also called the ineligibility “an embarrassment to me and my family.” Lopez claims the time off has helped him grow, giving him an improved work ethic, which definitely is showing, as his production is up noticeably across the board.

Lopez is listed at 260 pounds this season, up from 240 last season, and it definitely shows. He seems to be holding the added bulk very well, and is probably now at his ideal career playing weight, being very physically mature for his age. Stanford is relying on Lopez to score more this season, especially on the low block, where Lopez’s results have been mixed. Inside five feet, Lopez looks nearly automatic, showing good touch and the strength to finish over pretty much anyone at this level. He shows solid footwork and will use drop-steps, spin moves, and mini-hooks to score. When he wants to, Lopez does an excellent job establishing deep position and sealing his man off down low.

Sometimes, though, he seems content to stay in the five to seven foot range, where his success drops considerably. Lopez is very formulaic in this range when he has his back to the basket, never trying to further back his man down once he has the ball, never putting the ball on the floor for more than one dribble, and almost always going right up into a right-handed hook shot or a turnaround jumper, often rushing his shot. Watching him in this area of the court, you get the idea that he knows exactly what he’s going to do even before he gets the ball, regardless of how the defense is reacting to him. He shows no counter-moves or fakes in this range, and doesn’t adjust to what the defense gives him. Lopez has had very little success with his hook shot from this range so far this season, and while he’s done slightly better with his turnaround jumper, he still isn’t converting on that consistently either. It seems as if Lopez really lacks in comfort level and confidence with his back to the basket in this five to seven foot range, and that’s something he’ll need to work on moving forward.

While Lopez looks very uncomfortable with his back to the basket outside of five feet, the same cannot be said when he faces up. Lopez is at his best facing up from the five to ten foot range, where he seems very comfortable in the triple-threat position, and likes to take jump shots with a hand in his face. He will occasionally put the ball on the floor from here, but struggles when not in space, and it usually will only lead to an ill-advised pull-up jumper. Stanford uses Lopez on the low block the majority of possessions, though in the long-term, he definitely will be better suited switching from the low to high post, where he could make better use of his face-up game and mid-range jumper.

Lopez also has shown a strong knack for finishing on rolls to the basket off pick-and-roll situations, using his size, touch, and good hands to consistently catch and finish at the rim. He also has improved his rebounding this year, showing a good pursuit of the ball and a consistent tendency to box out his man strongly. At the rim, Lopez has the size and strength to often come down with rebounds in a crowd, but unlike someone like a Dwight Howard for example, Lopez doesn’t have the explosiveness to power up through a crowd of defenders for the emphatic dunk.

On the defensive end, Lopez has done a good job this season, showing versatility and a lot of potential as a defender. In man-to-man situations in the post, Lopez plays a strange style of defense, never using a hand or forearm on his opponent, rather keeping his hands outstretched in the air and just using his body to stay in front of his man by moving laterally. This throws many players off, forcing them into travels or offensive fouls, and also allows Lopez to contest anyone who tries to shoot over him, but it also leaves him prone to being backed down when someone with his strength shouldn’t be. Laterally, Lopez is definitely above average for a seven-footer, looking competent when forced out on the perimeter, and also doing a good job defending pick-and-rolls with his mobility. He does show some problems reacting to quick moves by agile forwards in the post, though. As a weakside shot blocker, Lopez is very aware and focused, and is solid contesting and blocking shots in the lane in a very controlled manner, not committing foolish fouls.

Lopez will have a very strong case for declaring for the draft this year, where he should be considered among the top big men available after the initial elite tier of prospects. He is mobile and coordinated for a big man, with good athleticism, though he isn’t overly explosive. He also brings a versatile and developing skill-set to the table, while playing both ends of the floor. Despite his academic ineligibility to start this season, his character can probably be viewed as a plus, as he appears to be a hard worker and shows good intensity on the floor. He projects as more of a center at the next level, though should be able to play power forward at times, depending on matchups.
[Read Full Article]
 
Top NBA Draft Prospects in the Pac-10 (Part One: #1-#5)
September 18, 2007
The more offensively gifted of the Lopez twins, Brook will be relied upon greatly this upcoming season in a Stanford offense that struggled at times putting points on the board in their 06-07 campaign. Playing alongside another seven footer (his twin Robin), he will have the opportunity to show off his skills from the perimeter yet again, while also earning more opportunities to go one on one with another big man for defenses to key upon.

Numbers are deceiving for Lopez, as he started the season off at nowhere near 100%, coming off of back surgery. Although he posted a respectable scoring average of 12.6 points per game, the Stanford post scored nearly 18 points per game in the final 8 games of his freshman campaign. His ability to score inside and out gave defenses fits late in the year, with his Cardinal teammates giving him increased touches in the pivot.

When on the blocks, Brook has two main moves that he likes to go to: A smooth right handed hook shot and a turnaround jumper. While it might be frustrating for some to see a player seven feet tall fading away from the basket in order to score his points, Lopez has shown the ability to knock down this shot with consistency. His soft touch allows him to get many “shooter’s bounces” and help him convert on the multitude of inside baskets he gets through cuts and offensive rebounds. Two areas of concern in terms of Brook’s skills down low are his non-existent left hand and inability to pass the ball out of double teams. He often counts on his size down low, using his right hand at times where he would clearly be more beneficial by using his left. Lopez struggles mightily when faced with a double team, often duped into turnovers or forced shots. Both of these areas must be improved upon if he hopes to reach his optimum draft stock after his sophomore season. He also can be a bit on the soft side at times on the offensive end, shying away from contact and loafing around near the three point arc a bit more then you’d like to see.

Stepping away from the basket is where Brook appears to prefer to play on the offensive end, however. Possessing range out to college three point line, he was able to open up the floor for his brother Robin with his ability to score from the perimeter. We had the chance to observe Lopez this summer during an open gym session at the LeBron James Skills Academy, where we were surprised to see that he can even shoot the ball with consistency out to the NBA three point line. His capability to stretch the defense and create one on one opportunities for teammates will only help him in the eyes of NBA scouts.

On the defensive end, Brook will come into his sophomore season as one of the top candidates for the PAC-10 Defensive Player of The Year award. His ability to block shots was on display throughout the entire season, especially during his remarkable twelve block performance versus USC in late January. What is even more impressive about Lopez’s ability to block shots is that he is able to do it without getting in foul trouble, averaging only 2.7 fouls per game last season. His timing, length, and ability to intimidate with either hand puts him amongst the top defensive big men prospects in this draft. While his relatively meager average of only 6 rebounds per game might be a bit alarming, that number is a bit misleading due to the fact that Lopez played only 25.6 minutes per game.

Lopez is blessed with excellent physical attributes-- including a legit seven foot body, outstanding wingspan, and above average leaping ability for a center prospect. His frame is not carrying anything close to its maximum weight, as it could stand to gain another 20 pounds or so easily. The big man does a nice job running the floor, often filling the wings in transition and beating opposing centers down the floor for easy buckets.

This season could serve as a breakout year for Lopez, given that he is now at full health and is blessed with two outstanding frontcourt mates in his brother Robin and Lawrence Hill. Playing alongside those two will not allow opposing defenses to double team him, which should result in increased statistical output. Anyway you look at it, Lopez enters this season as one of the elite big men prospects in the NCAA, and a player who could easily land in the lottery if he is able to build upon his bright freshman season.
[Read Full Article]
 
adidas Nations Basketball Experience Notebook (Day One+Two)
August 5, 2007
Brook Lopez has been fairly disappointing so far, looking frustrated at times and not very focused. He isn't fighting for position well enough in the post to take advantage of his excellent physical tools, and he still has a ways to go in terms of learning how to use his body to his advantage. His footwork down low leaves a lot to be desired as well, causing him to settle for some very weak turnaround jumpers in the post that barely drew iron. Offensively he's clearly still a work in progress. He also fumbled a couple of pretty good passes. Lopez did get some production on the offensive glass and through running the floor and finishing around the basket. He also played solid defense on Brian Butch and Sasha Kaun.
[Read Full Article]
 
LeBron James Skills Academy Day Three
July 10, 2007
Brook was downright breathtaking with his ability to shoot the ball from the perimeter, knocking down numerous three point shots from beyond the NBA three-point arc. He and LeBron James ran the pick and pop to perfection, with Brook being the recipient of many of LeBron’s assists throughout the scrimmages. He wasn’t the strongest on the defensive end against bullish forwards such as Adrien and Rhode Island forward Will Harris, but he did block his fair share of shots on the day. If Lopez is able to play his sophomore year at Stanford the way he played in this open gym, there is no reason why he should not be a lottery candidate by the time the year is over.
[Read Full Article]
 
NCAA Tournament: Stock Watch (round of 64, Thursday)--Down/Neutral
March 15, 2007
On paper this may have looked like a good game for freshman stud Brook Lopez, but breaking down the tape, that couldn’t be any further from the truth. In the decisive first half, where Stanford was outscored by 26 points, Lopez had only 4 points and was pushed around at will by anyone he tried to defend. He looked out of sorts on both ends of the floor, making some very careless passes, missing short jumpers that he would normally convert, putting the ball on the floor and turning it over, and getting eaten alive in the paint by Derrick Caracter and David Padgett. Lopez bit on their pump-fakes time after time and was outmuscled in the paint by the two, only managing to recover once the game was in garbage time well into the 2nd half.

Once the pressure was off and there was really nothing left to play for, Lopez started showing the talent that has gotten many people (prematurely?) excited about his upside. He his a pretty right handed jump-hook from about 6 feet out, stroked a mid-range and turn-around jumper, dunked back an offensive rebound, and came up with a big one-handed tomahawk jam after putting the ball on the floor. He had 14 points in the 2nd half, but it was all for naught, as no one on Louisville was taking things seriously anymore and Rick Pitino even got to clear his bench with 5 minutes left in the game.

Lopez has repeatedly stated that he’s in no rush to leave for the NBA after his freshman season, and after this bitter defeat, that’s probably a good thing. He’s got outstanding upside but still has plenty of things he can work on, including his footwork, balance, strength and defensive ability. We’re looking forward to seeing how he bounces back in his sophomore year.
[Read Full Article]
 
DX Indvividual Awards: Pac-10
March 7, 2007
Freshman of the Year: Brook Lopez, 7’0, C, Stanford

Freshman hype was everywhere in the Pac-10 early in the season, with Chase Buddinger and Spencer Hawes so highly touted and players like Ryan Anderson, Quincy Pondexter and Taj Gibson playing well beyond their years. But it was the newcomer everybody forgot about that emerged as a fairly cut and dry choice for Pac-10 FOY. Brook Lopez’s overall numbers weren’t quite as gaudy as several of the other candidates’, but in conference he stacked up to just about anybody. Lopez scored 20 or more in 7 of Stanford’s last 10 games and put the entire country on notice with an 18 point, 11 rebound, 12 block triple double in a blowout win over USC. Of course, stats don’t tell the entire story when it comes to Lopez’s impact on the game. He is an excellent positional defender, and it is his emergence as a Pac-10 star that has Stanford in the NCAA Tournament.
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NCAA Weekly Performers, 1/31/07-- Part Two
February 1, 2007
If you are still trying to nail down which Lopez twin is which, don't feel too bad. It took the DX staff a while also. But Stanford's highly-touted 7-footers aren't just those two freshmen putting up decent numbers out on the west coast anymore. The Cardinal's national profile has increased substantially over the course of the season, capped off by a pair of impressive victories over USC and of course UCLA. While it is probably unfair to single out either twin over the other, since they are both excellent NBA prospects, it is the increased role and productivity of Brook Lopez that has really made the difference for Trent Johnson. His breakout performance came in the victory over USC, where he gave fellow freshman standout Taj Gibson fits and came away with an 18 point, 11 rebound, 12 block triple double.

While Lopez may not have the unmistakable power of Greg Oden, the freakish skill of Kevin Durant, or the explosive athleticism of Brandan Wright, he does pass the initial look test with flying colors. Checking in at a chiseled 7'0, 240 pounds, Lopez is filling out his frame quite nicely. He already has the strength to control the paint against virtually any big man in the Pac-10, and it looks like he could gain quite a bit more weight without slowing down much. Lopez doesn't fly up and down the court, but he does move very well for his size, exhibiting excellent body control and balance - especially as an individual post defender and weakside shot blocker. His first leap isn't explosive, but Lopez is a phenomenal anticipator and understands how to contest shots without picking up silly fouls.

There is also a lot to like about Brook Lopez on the offensive end. He isn't exactly a natural back to the basket scorer, but has a passable repertoire of scoring moves on the low block. He sometimes has a tendency to get pushed away from the basket and then go to low-percentage post moves instead of kicking the ball back out to a guard, but the basics are there. Lopez is very comfortable facing the basket in the high post or on the perimeter and is already showing range out past the college 3-point line. He forces opposing big men to come out and guard him on the perimeter, as his 15-18 foot jumper is very smooth and extremely accurate. Lopez finishes very well around the basket, showing off plenty of power and explosiveness when he has a clear path to the rim. Over time, expect to see more fireworks on this side of the ball.

While it isn't clear when Brook Lopez would be comfortable with exploring his draft options, it is becoming more and more clear that the shorter-haired twin is a lottery-caliber talent whenever he wants to be. His emergence was slowed because of a preseason injury, but it isn't going to be long before that 10-5-2 line reads 15-12-4. Under normal circumstances, 7-footers this good don't last very long at the college level. The scary thing for Stanford opponents is that we haven't even started talking about Robin yet...
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2006 McDonald's All-American Game, individual player breakdown
March 30, 2006
Brook, the higher regarded of the twins, did not live up to his billing today. The seven footer looked a bit lost out on the floor, and did not play with his usual aggressiveness. Although he knocked down a 16 foot jumper, Lopez never seemed to command the ball, playing very passively. He is more athletic and has more offensive skills then his brother Robin, but was unfortunately outplayed by his younger brother (by one minute) on this day. Expect both to really help out Stanford’s depleted front line next season.
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