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Jordan Bell profile
Drafted #38 in the 2017 NBA Draft by the Warriors
RCSI: 119 (2014)
Height: 6'9" (206 cm)
Weight: 227 lbs (103 kg)
Age: 22.9
Position: PF
Jerseys: #2, #1
High School: Long Beach Polytechnic High School (California)
Hometown: Long Beach, CA
Agent: Aaron Mintz
AAU: ICP Elite
College: Oregon
Current Team: Warriors
Win - Loss: 13 - 4
Jordan Bell 2017 NBA Draft Scouting Video - Strengths

PreDraft Measurements

Year Source Height w/o Shoes Height w/ Shoes Weight Wingspan Standing Reach No Step Vert Max Vert
2017 NBA Draft Combine 6'7" 6'8 ½" 224 6'11 ¾" 8'8 ½" 31.5" 38"
2016 Nike Basketball Academy - 6'8 ½" 227 6'11" - - -

Basic Per Game Stats

Season GP Min Pts 2pt 3pt FT Rebounds Ast Stl Blk TO PF
M A % M A % M A % Off Def Tot
2017/18 12 8.4 3.2 1.6 2.3 70.4% 0.0 0.0 0.0% 0.0 0.1 0.0% 0.8 1.4 2.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 0.6 1.5

Articles

Jordan Bell NBA Pro Day Workout Video and Interview

Matt McGann
Matt McGann
Jun 17, 2017, 01:36 pm
Oregon big man Jordan Bell is interviewed following his NBA Pro Day workout in LA. Full video and interview included, produced by Matt McGann.  
DX Pre-Draft Workout Circuit
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-Tyler Lydon Interview and Workout
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-Jawun Evans Interview and Workout
-Alec Peters Interview and Workout
-Thomas Bryant Interview and Workout
-Johnathan Motley Interview and Workout
-Josh Hart Pro Day Workout
-Frank Mason Interview and Workout
-Kyle Kuzma Interview and Workout
-Dilllon Brooks Workout and Interview
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-Dominique Hawkins Interview and Workout
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-Matt Thomas Pro Day Workout and Interview
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2017 NBA Combine Athletic Testing Analysis

Julian Applebome
Julian Applebome
May 13, 2017, 05:25 pm
Oregon's Jordan Bell shined in the 5 on 5 portion on day 1 of the Combine, flying around on defense while also showing a budding offensive skill set.  He continued to stand out in the athletic testing, particularly in the lane agility and shuttle run drills, both of which are typically dominated by guards.  His shuttle run time of 2.83 was fourth overall, just six tenths of a second behind the top score held by Frank Jackson.  He also posted a lane agility time of 10.63 seconds, which would be the third best time per our database of any power forward drafted, trailing only Joel Bolomboy and Quincy Acy.  Bell's do it all defensive and rebounding style of play has definitely played well at the Combine and it would not be surprising to see him potentially get looks from NBA teams at the end of the first round of some draft boards. Bell initially registered a shuttle time of 2.56, which would have been the best mark in the history of our database, but for some reason that was disqualified. 

NBA Combine Competitive Action Recap: Day One

Jonathan Givony
Jonathan Givony
Mike Schmitz
Mike Schmitz
May 11, 2017, 08:04 pm
13 points, 7 rebounds, 5 blocks, 5 assists, 3 turnovers, 5-7 2P, 3-5 FT, 25 1/2 minutes

Jordan Bell posted perhaps the most impressive stat-line of the entire day, doing a little bit of everything for his team, and like Frank Mason, seeing them completely collapse (+3 when in, -21 when out) once he went to the bench. He did all the usual things scouts have come to expect from him, flying around on both ends of the floor, protecting the rim both on the ball and rotating from the weakside, playing lockdown defense on PFs and Cs alike, closing out aggressively on the perimeter, and holding his ground in the post. He mixed that in with some nice flashes on offense, particularly with his passing on the move, and even finding some success with the ball in his hands on short isos and post-ups en-route to an efficient 13 points. It was beneficial for Bell to play such a solid game in front of quite a few NBA head coaches that likely had never seen him before, as his high-effort, but still very consistent and solid style has to be very attractive to teams looking to solidify their rotations picking in the late first or early second round portion of the draft.

Jordan Bell NBA Draft Scouting Report and Video Analysis

Julian Applebome
Julian Applebome
May 07, 2017, 10:38 am
Scouting Report and Video Analysis by Julian Applebome
 
Jordan Bell, the 2017 Pac 12 Defensive Player of the year, burst on to the national consciousness with a memorable Elite Eight performance in a victory of Kansas which included 8 blocks, 13 rebounds, 4 assists, and numerous game changing plays on the defensive end.  The Long Beach, California native was a solid piece for the Ducks as a redshirt sophomore, but with the departure of Elgin Cook and Dwayne Benjamin, Bell took on a whole new role and starred as the defensive and rebounding anchor of an Oregon team that made its first NCAA Final Four appearance since 1939. 
 


At 6'9, 225 pounds, and a wingspan measuring 6'11, Bell is somewhat stuck between the power forward and center position from a physical perspective, but projects more as a 5 at the NBA level given his offensive skill set.  What Bell lacks in ideal size, length and bulk at the center position, he makes up for with effort and elite-level athletic ability, which allows him to impact the game as rebounder, shot blocking threat, pick and roll switcher, finisher, and transition scorer. 
 
On the offensive end, Bell had the most productive season of his college career, averaging a career best 11.0 points per game on an efficient 63.6% from the field.  The two aspects of Bell's offensive game where he contributes most are in transition and as a catch and finish guy around the rim.  He runs the floor extremely well for a big, and has the athleticism and coordination to be an effective rim runner and lob target in the open court.  In the half court, he is best cutting off the ball, or sitting along the baseline waiting for dump off finishes.  He has great hands and is a quick leaper who can catch and finish above the rim very swiftly.  His mobility, hands, and athleticism should project him as viable threat diving at the rim out of pick and rolls.  He wasn't featured heavily as a pick and roll option at Oregon (just 9.5% of his total offense via Synergy), due to the Ducks' personnel, but proved to be capable when he was.   
 
Skill wise, Bell's offensive production as a scorer is very much a work in progress.  While he has shown improvement with his back to the basket, he lacks any real advanced moves and relies on short jump hooks around the rim.  His touch around the basket comes and goes, and he can be turnover prone creating on the low block when faced with pressure. 
 
He shot just 10 for 31 on jumpers this year, with the majority of those makes coming inside of 17 feet.  He struggles with consistency on his perimeter shot, and often passes up open looks without creating any real high percentage opportunities off the bounce.  His release is on the slow side and he gets an inconsistent trajectory on his shot outside of mid-range areas.  His ability to improve on his jump shot will be key to opening up the rest of his offensive game, and allowing for better team spacing as defenses don't currently have to worry about him stretching the floor. 
 
While Bell struggles for the most part creating offense in one on one situations, he does handle and pass well for a guy at his position.  He has a fairly quick first step and is capable of attacking the basket in a straight line and finishing with either hand.  He averaged 2.5 assists per 40 minutes this season, and his ability to read the floor on the move out of short rolls should translate very well with NBA spacing. 
 
An aspect of Bell's game that he excels in is his ability to rebound the basketball.  He averaged a career best 11.9 rebounds per 40 minutes, including 12+ rebounds in each of the Ducks NCAA Tournament's games.  He is best on the offensive glass, where he is aggressive and has great instincts attacking the ball off the rim.  His timing and athleticism allow him to be a big time threat attacking the offensive glass for tip-dunks.  His motor really shines on the offensive boards as well, where he shows his ability to get off the floor quickly and make multiple effort plays around the rim. 
 


Defensively, Bell also has the potential to be a solid rebounder, but relies more on his athleticism rather than boxing out technique, and can get caught ball watching at times.  His lack of bulk is somewhat of a concern here, as he is prone to getting moved around by stronger players, something that could be somewhat of an issue on the defensive glass in the NBA.
 
A lot of the intrigue around Bell in the NBA stems from the versatility and impact that he can have on the defensive end of the floor.  Despite his lack of ideal size and length, he is a tremendous weak side shot blocker, and shows incredible timing rotating over off the ball and protecting the rim.  He averaged 3.1 blocks per 40 minutes, with many of those coming in highlight reel fashion.  He controls the paint in the half court as an interior shot blocking presence and has the speed and leaping ability to make chase down blocks in transition. 
 
Outside of his shot blocking ability, he also has great anticipation getting into passing lanes, and has the lateral quickness to be able to switch onto smaller guards on the perimeter.  His ability to switch ball screens on the perimeter and guard multiple positions will be huge for his ability to stay on the floor at the next level.  At just 6'9 he does struggle to guard more traditional big men on the block, but the modern style of the NBA favors Bell's ability to stay on the floor in small ball lineups and spend time plugging gaps and guarding multiple positions.  A creative coaching staff might try and use him as a stopper on go-to scorers who are bigger wing players or combo forward types, and he appears to have the quickness to hold his own here.
 
It took four years at Oregon for Jordan Bell to fully grow into his role as a defensive enforcer and rebounder, but it comes at a good time, as many NBA teams are in the market for a big man who can defend multiple positions, rebound, protect the basket, and stay on the court with guard oriented lineups. He has a lot of room for improvement on the offensive end of the floor, but his energy and defense should translate well at the NBA level and if he can carve out a similar blue collar role with an NBA team, he should have a successful career. 

NCAA Tournament NBA Draft Prospect Guide: Final Four

Jonathan Givony
Jonathan Givony
Mar 31, 2017, 03:29 pm
Jordan Bell became a household name last weekend with a pair of dominant performances in the Sweet 16 and Elite 8. The 22-year old redshirt junior tallied 27 points, 26 rebounds, 5 assists and 10 blocks against Michigan and Kansas, showcasing incredible versatility defensively and boundless energy on both ends of the floor. He'll have a much more difficult matchup with UNC, as burly big man Kennedy Meeks will look to establish his dominance as a post scorer and offensive rebounder early and often. Meeks can carve out deep paint position on lankier big men, and scouts will want to see how Bell is able to handle him, as its a similar test to what he might see on certain nights in the NBA as an undersized center. Bell has been inconsistent at times as a defensive rebounder, but will need to be dominant in this department against the #1 offensive rebounding team in the country for Oregon to have any chance of winning.

NCAA Tournament NBA Draft Prospect Guide: Elite Eight Saturday

Jonathan Givony
Jonathan Givony
Mar 25, 2017, 10:24 am
Jordan Bell was the hero for Oregon against Michigan on both ends of the floor, being an incredible difference maker with his athleticism and energy. His ability to switch onto the perimeter and stay in front of guards was essential in the Sweet 16, and he now faces perhaps the biggest test of his college career in Kansas' vaunted backcourt, which has been on fire as of late (and all season really). Bell had some impressive moments offensively against Michigan as well, finding advantages in the post against a poor defender in Moritz Wagner, coming up with numerous offensive rebounds, and making a couple of beautiful passes on short rolls to open shooters spotting up behind the 3-point line.  Kansas will pose a much bigger test, and scouts will be watching to see how he fares against the rock-solid Landen Lucas, who did a great job against Purdue's outstanding frontcourt on Thursday.

Top NBA Prospects in the Pac-12, Part Seven: Prospects 11-15

Julian Applebome
Julian Applebome
Jonathan Givony
Jonathan Givony
Matt Kamalsky
Matt Kamalsky
Kyle Nelson
Kyle Nelson
Sep 18, 2016, 08:44 am
Kyle Nelson

After a promising freshman season, Oregon big man Jordan Bell spent his entire summer and eight games into his sophomore campaign recovering from foot surgery. While his sophomore season was inconsistent, Bell recovered by March and played a key role on Oregon's NCAA Tournament run to the Elite Eight. With a full off-season under his belt and plenty of time to work on his game, Bell has the opportunity to show scouts that he is more than an athletic shot blocker.



At 6'9 with a 6'11 wingspan, Bell has solid size for the power forward position, but average length. His wiry 227-pound frame continues to improve, and looks like it will fill out long term as much as needed. While he plays mostly the center position offensively and doesn't have great height or a long wingspan to do so in the NBA, he is able to compensate for that with a tremendous athletic profile for a big man. He runs the floor well in transition, demonstrates excellent quickness and mobility covering ground exceptionally well all over the court, and is highly explosive around the basket.

While Bell remains quite raw on the offensive end, he played a bigger role in Oregon's offense as a sophomore, and didn't see any real drop-off in his efficiency in turn. He averaged a much more acceptable 13.1 points per 40 minutes pace adjusted, up from 7.8 as a freshman, while posting a 57% TS%. As was the case during his freshman season, he saw nearly all of his possessions in the immediate vicinity of the basket, but was given more opportunities to create looks for himself in the post as a sophomore.

Bell saw a majority of his touches off of cuts to the basket, in transition, and off of his teammates misses. On film, it's clear as to why this is the case. Bell's footwork is raw, he tends to favor his right hand, and he does not have particularly soft hands or shooting touch. While he occasionally strings together a series of impressive plays, his post repertoire is limited to spin moves and the occasional up-and-under. In general, he still relies on his quickness over fundamentals to score in the post.

Bell continued to show some potential in his face-up game, but in a relatively small sample size. He can occasionally put the ball on the floor and get to the basket in a few dribbles, but his handles are not reliable enough to do so consistently. Likewise, he displays better shooting mechanics than you would expect from a 51.9% free throw shooter, but on just 12 attempts and to inconclusive results. He also shows better court vision than one would expect, but his 23% turnover rate reflects the fact that sometimes he appears to play as though he does not know his limitations.

He is at his best, however, while using his physical tools to his advantage and letting his teammates create opportunities for him. Most notably, he is a reliable finisher in transition and does a good job of cutting to the basket. He does not have the softest hands, but he is far quicker and more nimble than many collegiate big men and uses his explosiveness and length to make acrobatic plays at the rim look easy.

Bell's defensive versatility and overall prowess is what will give him a chance to make a NBA roster and stick long term. Few players show the ability to cover ground the way he can, as he displays an excellent combination of lateral quickness, agility and quick-twitch explosiveness, which allows him to defend big men, forwards, wings and guards all over the floor, while disrupting passing lanes, and altering shots at the basket. He once again stood out as one of a handful of players in our database to average two blocks and two steals per 40 minutes pace adjusted. He set Oregon's career blocked shot record in just 50 games while averaging 3.0 blocks per 40 minutes pace adjusted as a sophomore.

Yet, his fundamentals still lag behind his athleticism and he lacks the strength to hold his position against stronger offensive players. While he improved somewhat as a rebounder, his 7.0 defensive rebounds per 40 minutes pace adjusted still situate him as just average relative to other big men in our database and he does not consistently display the fundamentals or intensity required to exploit his physical advantages at this level.

Overall, Jordan Bell's sophomore season wasn't all that different statistically than his freshman season, which makes sense considering the injury he suffered and needed to recover from. His breakout NCAA tournament performance showed scouts that he still a highly intriguing prospect, though, as few players possess his combination of athleticism and defensive versatility at his size, being able to guard virtually any position on the floor. Bell could take a significant step forward as a junior with a full offseason under his belt, as he showed some very impressive things at the Nike Academy in Los Angeles this past June. The time is likely now as Bell will turn 22 in January. Oregon returns quite a bit of talent next year and Bell will be able to showcase his talent thoroughly on a team looking to repeat its deep 2016 NCAA Tournament run.

NCAA Tournament Sweet 16 NBA Draft Prospect TV Schedule: Thursday

Jonathan Givony
Jonathan Givony
Mar 23, 2016, 03:47 pm
Keep an eye on Jordan Bell, who is a very limited offensive player that lives mostly off opportunities created for him around the rim by his guards. But with that said, you'd be hard pressed to find a more athletic or versatile big man defensively, as he's capable of absolutely hounding smaller players on the perimeter with his quickness and length, but also has great timing around the basket. He's one of just two players in college basketball to average over 2 steals and 2.5 blocks per-40 minutes. He could be a difference maker against someone like Ingram.

Top NBA Prospects in the Pac-12, Part Seven: Prospects #17-20

Derek Bodner
Derek Bodner
Jacob Eisenberg
Jacob Eisenberg
Jonathan Givony
Jonathan Givony
Matt Kamalsky
Matt Kamalsky
Sep 09, 2015, 06:54 pm
Matt Kamalsky

A consensus top-75 recruit in high school, who was subsequently forced to redshirt his first year at Oregon due to not being cleared academically until December, Jordan Bell got thrown into the fire as a freshman, averaging 4.9 points, 6 rebounds, and 2.6 blocks over 24 minutes per game, emerging as a regular starter for Oregon mid-year.



Listed at 6-9, with a long wingspan, Bell is a mobile, agile power forward who makes an impact with his athleticism. Tipping the scales around 220, Bell will need to get stronger in the coming seasons to help him hold his own inside, but he has plenty of time to work on his body in the coming years.

Skill-wise, Bell is a fairly limited player at this point, seeing most of his touches around the basket and in transition, while not being counted on for scoring regularly in Oregon's offense. Capable of playing above the rim and showing nice explosiveness inside, Bell has average footwork and touch and tries to do too much in the air at times. He finishes reliably, and flashes some potential as a midrange shooter and face up driver, but doesn't have a reliable means to create for himself at this stage. Getting to the line at a low rate, shooting only 50% once he gets there, and showing little post game to speak of, Bell has a long way to go offensively as his skill-level is clearly still catching up with his physical tools, even if he surprises you at times with his court vision and passing ability.

As a rebounder, Bell is capable on both ends, but could be more aggressive crashing the boards. He doesn't appear to have the best instincts, getting by largely on athleticism, and doesn't always seek out bodies to box out, two things he'll have to improve if he's to take the next step as a rebounder.

Where Bell does already make contributions is as a shot-blocker, an area where he ranked among the top-20 players in the entire country on a per-minute basis. An extremely aggressive off-ball defender, Bell pursues shots rotating over from the weakside with reckless abandon, swatting shots that many players wouldn't even pursue. Committing 4.4 fouls per-40 minutes pace adjusted while blocking 4.1 shots, Bell can be a bit too aggressive at times defensively, but flashes terrific potential as a rim protector.

As an on-ball defender, Bell is a bit less successful, as more mature, polished, and stronger post scorers take advantage of his lack of strength and discipline inside. He has nice foot speed allowing him to defend smaller players at times on the perimeter, but doesn't have a great grasp of how to use that to his advantage, often finding himself out of position when opposing players look to take him off the bounce. At this stage, Bell still has room to grow as a defender, but has a lot of upside on this end of the floor.

Unlike so many young, fairly raw defensive-oriented big men we've seen in the past, Jordan Bell got the opportunity to play significant minutes right away. While he wasn't overwhelmingly productive, his inclusion on the Pac-12 All-Defensive and All-Freshman teams a year ago is telling of how big his role was a year ago. Players in his mold can make big, sudden jumps in ability so it makes sense to continue to keep track of his progress to see how he's improving, and despite offseason foot surgery, there's little question Bell will have ample opportunity to showcase whatever progress he's made once again this season.

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11/19/2017 118 - 111 at Nets Nets
11/18/2017 124 - 116 at 76ers 76ers
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